Wednesday, 18 September 2019

8:00 AM — 2:00 PM

Registration

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

8:00 — 9:00 AM

Welcome Coffee

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

9:00 — 9:05 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Saal 1-2

Senior Editor, Europe,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Greg Knowler

9:05 — 9:45 AM

Day 2 Keynote Address

Location: Saal 1-2

Senior Editor, Europe,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Speaker Introduction

Greg Knowler

President and CEO, 

World Shipping Council

Keynote Speaker

John Butler

In this keynote address kicking off Day 2 of the 2020 JOC Container Trade Europe Conference, John Butler, president and CEO of the World Shipping Council, will make the point that even as the industry converts to the low-sulfur fuel required under the IMO2020 mandate, the fact is that as long as shipping burns fossil fuel it will not be able to reach the zero-carbon goals set by the IMO. Butler also will outline the WSC's plans to set up a maritime research program within the IMO to help focus industry ideas and identify the fuel of the future and what that will mean for container shipping.

9:45 — 10:45 AM

Green Supply Chains: The Shipper's Choice

Location: Saal 1-2

Senior Editor, Europe,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Greg Knowler

Global Head of GoGreen
and Customer Intelligence Program,

DHL Global Forwarding

Panelist

Kathrin Brost

Policy Manager,
Maritime Transport,
European Shippers' Council

Panelist

Jordi Espin

Director, Collaborative Initiatives,

Transport and Logistics,
Clean Cargo Working Group,
BSR

Panelist

Angie Farrag-Thibault

Ph.D,
CEO and Co-Founder,
Searoutes

Panelist

Pierre Garreau

Senior Trader,
Shell Trading International

Panelist

Urvesh Kotecha 

The tools are available for shippers to measure the greenhouse gas emissions of their transportation providers, giving cargo owners a clear choice: ship dirty, or ship clean. With environmental regulations tightening and pressure mounting around social responsibility, taking the dirty route is no longer a viable option. For transportation service providers, this growing decarbonization momentum allows them to differentiate themselves, offering more sustainable services and giving customers verifiable and measurable emissions data. The market has various carbon offsets that service providers and shippers can buy, and while there is no compliance required yet in this area, it is surely not far off. At the moment much of the emissions management solutions are competitive add-ons, but how soon before they become standard? How reliable is the supply chain emissions data produced by carriers, and will it stand up to a challenge? Does the provision of that data come at a cost and is there a return on that investment for carriers and 3PLs? Should green costs be incorporated into the transport rates? Are shippers prepared to pay for greener services, and should they even have a choice? This session will analyze the increasing environmental pressure faced by all supply chain stakeholders and how they should adapt.

10:45 — 11:15 AM

Networking Coffee Break

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

11:15 AM — 12:15 PM

Location: Saal 1-2

View From the Top:
A Conversation With Industry Leaders

Senior Editor, Europe,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Greg Knowler

Global Freight Lead,
Nestlé

Panelist

Jochen Gutschmidt

Senior Vice President and
Head of Global Trades,
Kuehne + Nagel

Panelist

Paolo Montrone

Managing Director,
Global Markets and Global Sales,
Hapag-Lloyd

Panelist

Hans Schaefer

What is the perspective and outlook of industry leaders as we get deeper into 2019, a year that could prove to be pivotal for international logistics? As we look forward into 2020 and beyond, how do industry leaders see their segments of the industry evolving? Where are risks emerging in the European import and export supply chains? What will be the impact of regulatory mandates such as the IMO 2020 low-sulfur fuel regulation and the tough new European emission targets? In this session, we will have a lively discussion with a group of industry leaders about how they see the future unfolding in 2020 and beyond.

12:15 — 1:15 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

(Seating available in Saal 4-6, 7-9)

1:15 — 2:00 PM

Connecting Carriers:
Blockchain and the Digital Container Shipping Association

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Chief Operating Officer,
Digital Container
Shipping Association

Panelist

Henning Schleyerbach

Chief Operating Officer
and Co-Founder,
Smart Maritime Network

Panelist

Cathy Hodge

Location: Saal 1-2

Creating value by controlling data within an integrated cargo network is the goal of container shipping companies as the world’s largest carriers jump aboard new initiatives within the digital space. Mediterranean Shipping Co. and CMA CGM have joined Maersk in its TradeLens blockchain and visibility joint venture with IBM, alleviating fears that the project would not extend to the wider container shipping industry, while CMA CGM, Cosco Shipping, Cosco Shipping Ports, Hapag-Lloyd, Hutchison Ports, OOCL, the Port of Qingdao, PSA International, and Shanghai International Port Group have signed up with the Global Shipping Business Network. More carriers are investing in smart containers from Traxens, and most of the world’s global carriers are now members of the Digital Container Shipping Association (DCSA), a group tasked with creating container data standards for track-and-trace systems. The DCSA will enable carriers to address rising demand for such services while mitigating the higher cost of delivering to shippers and forwarder customers. This session will analyze the goals, objectives, and what beneficial cargo owners stand to gain from the digital movement.

2:00 — 2:45 PM

Intermodal Crossroads:
Navigating an Increasingly Complex European Network

Location: Saal 1-2

Data from Eurostat shows that half of all rail freight transported across Europe is intermodal cargo that has used more than one transportation mode, typically road in the first and last mile and rail covering the main part, but also through the use of barge and short-sea shipping. Intermodal is defined in Europe as combined transport, and in that segment, the latest data show that volume across the European Union grew more than 7 percent in 2017. In ton-kilometer terms, a more accurate measure of the business that avoids double counting of transshipment, the growth rate was more than 30 percent year over year. In Germany, the largest European rail market, intermodal volume grew 28 percent. This intermodal cargo is the only segment in the European rail freight market that is growing, driven by the more intelligent use of transport mix and the lower emissions that can be derived from greater use of rail over longer distances. Gateway ports in the northern range and across the Mediterranean also are expanding their inland reach, investing in supply chains to improve connections with their hinterlands as volume increases. This session, part of a two-part track looking at European inland distribution, will analyze the intermodal market, assess its allure to shippers, and explore the outlook.

Editor-in-Chief,
DVZ

Session Chair

Sebastian Reimann

Vice President and Head of Ocean Freight + China Rail,
DHL Global Forwarding

Panelist

Felix Heger

Co-Partner
and Managing Partner,
Lebenswerk Consulting

Panelist

Alexander Nowroth

Managing Director,
IGS Intermodal Container Logistics

Panelist

Harald Rotter

Head of Railway Logistics
and Telematics,
Hamburg Port Authority

Panelist

Wolf-Jobst Siedler

Head of Business Development and Strategy,
Duisport

Panelist

Sascha Treppte

2:45 — 3:30 PM

The Growing Role of Short-Sea Shipping 

Location: Saal 1-2

Project Director,
Royal Haskoning

Session Chair

Jolke Helbing

CEO,

British Ports Association

Panelist

Richard Ballantyne

UK Trade Manager,
Samskip

Panelist

David Besseling

Founder and CEO,

Chill-Chain

Panelist

Jack Fleming

Market Intelligence Advisor,

Port of Antwerp

Panelist

Inge Nuytemans

Mounting overland transport challenges, the UK’s imminent withdrawal from the European Union, and tightening regulations on CO2 emissions are driving up the popularity of short-sea shipping as part of a combined transport alternative to rail and road. Volume handled by short-sea operators increased in 2018 and has continued to grow through 2019. It is hardly surprising, considering the challenges facing land-based modes. Trucking is facing a chronic shortage of drivers, rail reliability remains poor, and it doesn’t help that transport is the only sector of the European economy that has not reduced its CO2 emissions since 1990. So how are shippers and their service providers building short-sea shipping into their supply chains, and what are the cost benefits? Does it make sense to use short-sea options for Europe-UK cargo to avoid road congestion and customs delays after Brexit on Oct. 31? Join our panel of experts as they discuss the uncertainties that lie ahead in this second of our panels tackling intermodal transport in Europe.

3:30 PM

Closing Remarks

Location: Saal 1-2

Senior Editor, Europe,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Greg Knowler

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.